darkoshi: (Default)
[personal profile] darkoshi
It occurred to me that I wasn't clear on the differences between a badger, otter, beaver... not to mention, weasel, muskrat, mink, ferret...

Badger and Otter - best of friends (video).

Animal Identification Throwdown: Otter vs. Beaver vs. Muskrat

Animal ID Throwdown Follow-Up: Whither the Mink?

Muskrats and beavers are rodents. Most or all of the others are in the weasel family "Mustelidae".

This year, some of the trees by the pond at work have had the bark chewed off near the bottom. So I'm thinking, beavers. Though I haven't seen them.

Date: Monday, May 8th, 2017 04:48 pm (UTC)
lovelymavka: (Default)
From: [personal profile] lovelymavka
Beavers are a Canadian symbol. :-p

Date: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017 03:04 am (UTC)
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
From: [personal profile] randomdreams
Their range is immediately obvious: trees felled right beside waterways, with the stumps terminating in points, where they've been gnawed away, and if there's enough room, broad pools dammed with the felled trees that look totally unlike any other dams you'll ever see because they are somehow cleverly exactly level at the high water point, with the water pouring over the top along the entire breadth of the dam, and out in the middle in deeper water a huge hump where they live.

Muskrats are likewise particularly easy to spot: a huge lake with a wake progressing across it with no visible source. They swim with just their nose barely above the water, so they're practically invisible save for the wake.

Date: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017 02:52 pm (UTC)
lovelymavka: (Default)
From: [personal profile] lovelymavka
Oh yes. Beavers need to keep filing their teeth they are much like rabbits in that way.

Date: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017 02:52 am (UTC)
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
From: [personal profile] randomdreams
When my dad was in high school, people were seriously questioning whether beaver were extinct. They were functionally extinct in Colorado. Now they're everywhere, which cheers me greatly. Kinda weird-looking: if you see one up close, you realize their front teeth are both enormous and a deep blood-red color.
I've met almost all the animals on that list socially, in the wild, except for weasels.

Date: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017 03:00 am (UTC)
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
From: [personal profile] randomdreams
Note also interesting are marmots and pine martens. Marmots are ubiquitous around here. They look like filthy badgers. I've never seen a marten even though I live in their range. (I've also never seen a bobcat, lynx, or mountain lion.)

Date: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017 03:10 am (UTC)
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
From: [personal profile] randomdreams
I'm also really a fan of conies, aka pikas. They chirp when they see you, like prairie dogs do, but look vastly cuter. Plus they collect shiny things and take them back to their nests, sometimes including things like car keys that people put down, or coins.

Date: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017 05:01 am (UTC)
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
From: [personal profile] randomdreams
I had no idea that a woodchuck is a marmot. All the ones I've met were living well above treeline, so they were at best brushchucks.