Temple pain

Friday, September 22nd, 2017 11:29 pm
fayanora: Steph angry (Steph angry)
[personal profile] fayanora
Sometimes the muscles in my temple get hard and painful after chewing. Usually it passes after an hour or two. But it's now been doing it since around 8 am today and won't go away. It's not as bad as it was; earlier, it was bad enough I had to take pain relievers to get to sleep. But they're still not back to normal, and they still hurt.

It's especially vexing because I don't think I ate anything especially chewy yesterday.

The time we went and stayed with the ducks

Friday, September 22nd, 2017 06:37 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
Jane and I went up to Nethy Bridge, near Aviemore, and stayed at the Lazy Duck in one of their Eco-Lodges. Which is a cabin built for two, with electricity, gas cooking, and (distant, wobbly) wifi, right next to a large duck pond full of a variety of different species of ducks.
Loads of photos and four videos )

Interesting Links for 22-09-2017

Friday, September 22nd, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker

Interesting Links for 20-09-2017

Wednesday, September 20th, 2017 12:00 pm

Many Faces chapter 39!

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 10:33 pm
fayanora: Steph Candy (Steph Candy)
[personal profile] fayanora
“The Many Faces of Har—er, Adira Potter: Chapter 39”
By = Fayanora

Chapter 39 of The Many Faces of Har--er, Adira Potter is now published!

Chapter title: Hypatia's Gambit

Chapter blurb: Some secrets are revealed, Hypatia uses her Slytherin side to get some information, and Mr. Crouch - gone mental - appears and disappears.

Archive Of Our Own version

FanFiction dot net version (I changed the title at FF.net finally and the links appear to have changed as a result but old links still appear to work so *shrug*)

Big Closet version

Start at Chapter One: "Feeling Sic" = AO3, FF.net, BC

Interesting Links for 19-09-2017

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 12:00 pm

!Signalboost: CCleaner's been hacked (updated 9-20-17)

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 04:18 am
marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)
[personal profile] marahmarie

I'm uh, still reading about it, and even just as I was reading and trying to find out which version I have - without actually opening the program because holy crappola - Windows Defender displayed behind-the-scenes scan results saying it found an infection...in CCleaner. I'm not sure what to tell anyone as far as "what to do" because I don't know the answer to that.

ETA, 9-20-17: Current recommendations are to either use System Restore to roll back your system to a time before CCleaner 5.33 (32-bit) was installed, or else to "refresh" (Windows 10) or completely re-install your copy of Windows.

*curses*

It's a backdoor called Backdoor:Win32/Floxif that's been in the wild since CCleaner v.5.33 released in August of 2017. ETA, 9-20-17: But it affects 32-bit versions of CCleaner only. You can tell which version you have by opening CCleaner and looking in the top left corner, where it will say if it's 32-bit or 64-bit.

Signalbost: CCleaner has been hacked

Time to reinstall my OS, if the fucking backdoor hasn't already destroyed our ability to do so...ETA, 9-20-17: and I did just that. It didn't destroy our ability to do so, at least not as far as I can tell.

(no subject)

Sunday, September 17th, 2017 05:04 pm
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
[personal profile] randomdreams
Water temp meter part II:
I left the project half-finished last night, intending to fill the radiator with the water that had been lost in pulling out the water temperature sensor. This morning I got up, intending to drive the Spitfire over to the Annual Little British Car Show, poured a bunch of water in, and watched it cascade out of the sensor recess. Tightening the nutbolt (a bolt with a hole through the center that the sensor lives in) down didn't help. I drove my normal car over, checked out some pretty cars, and drove back, and then removed the sensor and started poking at it. Halfway up the bulb that lives in the water, there's a tapered ring of metal. I thought it was a precision tapered ring, that sealed against the matching taper inside the water pump. But this is automotive: there is nothing precision outside of the innards of the engine and transmission. Instead there was secretly a rubber gasket that, when I removed the old sensor, had stayed inside the water pump housing. It was totally shot, and no amount of trying to carefully put it back in was going to save it. I ended up getting an o-ring from my collection of high temperature water-resistant o-rings and using that instead, but because it was smaller, the nutbolt no longer managed to press the sensor down well enough to seal. I had to cut a little collet on the lathe, like a thick washer but sawed in half so it could be put in two pieces around the sensor line. With that, everything sealed correctly, as far as I can tell, and the car is ready to go again. A quick jaunt around the block shows the water temperature gauge indicating roughly the right numbers. I'll check tonight to see if the radiator is full of water.

(no subject)

Sunday, September 17th, 2017 09:26 am
randomdreams: riding up mini slickrock (Default)
[personal profile] randomdreams
The water temperature gauge on the Spitfire has slowly been dying. It was reading 120F when the car had been off for two days, and got up to 160F when the car was running. It was a really cheap unit. I bought another really cheap unit off ebay and replaced it last night, which was way more of a pain than it should have been, because the previous owner ran a LOT of extra wires through the grommet in the firewall and there was no longer room for the sensor to fit through. I also forgot that the first step is putting the gauge in the dash, because you can't remove the sensor from the gauge, so after routing the sensor through the grommet and along the engine and installing it in the water pump, I had to undo it, feed it through the dash, and redo it. But now it works, at least.

Yesterday I spent about five hours painting the house, getting a layer or two of exterior paint on all the sun-facing wood on the first floor, and getting a good start on the non-sun-facing wood. Today I'll get the small amount of wood on the second floor. Man this is sore work, all above my head, a lot of it from a ladder, but it should last several years and more importantly prevent the wood being damaged by being exposed, as it was. Looks a lot better, too, than all the flaking and peeling paint that had been there since we moved in.

Interesting Links for 17-09-2017

Sunday, September 17th, 2017 12:00 pm

Interesting Links for 16-09-2017

Saturday, September 16th, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker

Book 61 - Iain Banks "The Wasp Factory"

Friday, September 15th, 2017 05:15 pm
jazzy_dave: (bookish)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
Iain Banks "The Wasp Factory (Abacus)




Do not really know what to think of this book. It is very creative, but I somehow felt that it lacked something driving the story forward and I did not get drawn into the action, despite all the good things I have heard about it. Maybe another time.

Frank lives with his father on a small island in Scotland. He mounts animal skulls on poles, embeds wasps in candle wax, hunts rabbits with a flame thrower and keeps the skull of his enemy, Old Saul, in a bunker. The island is his domain and he rules it like a god. Now his brother, Eric, who sets dogs on fire, has escaped from his asylum and is on his way home.

Frank's a monster, a fledgling serial killer who capriciously decided on a different career track after his first three victims. His rituals and his ceremonies and his totemic objects make sense of the world and make sense of his own mind. His voice is sane, articulate, witty and intelligent. He uses it to describe his odd activities, makes them seem strange, unhealthy, perhaps, but essentially harmless. Then he seamlessly uses that same voice to describe catapulting small animals into river mud, the murder of his brother and two cousins or his attitude to women. One clings to the voice as a sign of potential redemption, but redemption is something you do, not something you are, and Frank is utterly aware of what he is and of what he has done. Or so he thinks.


The writing was very good, and the atmosphere was very engaging. I loved the way the suspense built as the story unfolded. I liked the descriptions of ceremony and obsession. It was intense at times and I found much of it to be disturbing. But the way the story fell apart at the end made it seem a little like a cheap slasher film. At first I was turned off by what I felt was shock tactics. Then I was convinced that it was justified, being part of a bigger meaning. By the end I'm not sure if it was just violence porn or not,much like I felt about "American Psycho".

I found the ending to be really unsatisfying. Mostly I thought "And?..." I understand what he was trying to do, and can somewhat appreciate it, but I would have liked it a lot more if it had been executed less clumsily. It almost felt like someone else had come in to finish the last part of the book and didn't really know how the story went. It's a weird combination of not tying up all the loose ends and over-explaining the thoughts and rationale of the main character that seemed out of step with the rest of the book.

So, in my final estimation, not a great read at all, and hence i will try and stick to his science fiction in the future.



I am angry about subscriptions

Friday, September 15th, 2017 01:13 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
When I rule the world the mechanism for cancelling a subscription will have to be at least as easy as the mechanism for setting one up.

So, for example*, if you can take out a subscription to the Financial Times online in about 30 seconds online, by clicking on a few options, then you should be able to cancel your subscription by clicking on something on your subscription details on their site. And they should not require you to email their support desk, reply with a second email explaining why you don't want it any more, and then answer a phone call wherein they offer it to you cheaper and then have to insist that, no, really, you don't want it any more.

The rule shall, instead, be that if ten random people take longer to unsubscribe than they did to subscribe that your home page will be replaced by a big flashing sign reading "We will treat you badly in the hope of holding on to your money."

Secondary rule: No introductory offers. Free trials are allowed (but must be easily cancellable, as above), but you can't offer new people a better deal than your existing customers. Introductory offers are a way of tricking people into signing up, and then hanging onto them when inertia stops them from cancelling/moving. Instead you must offer a good deal in the first place, which is sustainable, and which is easily compared to your competitors. I know this makes life harder for companies who are trying to hide long-term costs from their customers. I really, really, don't care.


*Or, possibly, exactly what happened to me at lunchtime.

Interesting Links for 15-09-2017

Friday, September 15th, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)
[personal profile] marahmarie

Amount of posts to add new image links to: 89 (some of these are imgur photo swaps because I don't trust them, either, and some are to edit out links to an image because it was lost or is no longer being made available) so say there are still around 80 posts to swap Photobucket images out of.

Dreamwidth's uploader lets you beam the server as many images as you like, so I fed it a bit north of 260 of them. At once. After deleting under 20 images and noting that another 20 won't be included in my posts, that still leaves about 220 image links to replace across 80 entries I've written.

And it's taken me the better part of a few weeks just to get this far because a) I don't feel like it, b) I got too busy on eBay up until I had to end all my sales early because of the fucking storm, 3) the storm, plus d) see a).

We don't have a link rewriter to automate this mess, so before I do anything I might campaign for it via Support request*, after checking to see if anyone else put in for one besides Steve from LJ (whose request was summarily rejected a few months ago), then check the web for any scripts that might help me get anything done here.

*ETA, 9-15-17: I put this into a Suggestion rather than a support request, since Support isn't set up to handle feature requests, and that's all this really is.

ETA2, 9-16-17: I've since posted two more (closely related) Suggestions. Considering the parent suggestion's topic matter, if one gets tossed they probably all will, yippee.

ETA3, 9-16-17: I've been trying (as I mentioned in my last Suggestion) to find a screen scraper to grab links to images I downloaded from Photobucket and uploaded last night to Dreamwidth, but there's not a one that's gonna work, or at least not without getting me ToSed, mostly because Dreamwidth doesn't make a public-facing, per-user image directory available for this (or any other) purpose. I'd almost hire someone to do what I'll have to do instead, but 1) my privacy and 2) that'd probably also get me ToSed. I just aaaarrggh.

ETA4, 9-16-17: Minutes after my last ETAs it hit me why, above all, I can't use Dreamwidth to host my Photobucket images: because DW changes the original file name on every image to a random number, so there's no pattern-matching/find-and-replace to either find the image in Dreamwidth's Manage Images interface nor to easily find its match to swap out with in the entry. So I'll just upload my Photobucket album to Anti-AOL on Wordpress (my Plan B to begin with) and do this whole thing from there.

Because I've got to get it done.

I could post yet another Suggestion at this point saying more or less, "Oh and btw can DW plz stop swapping out image names for like, random numbers because it's messing up my project" but it's too late now (for me, not for others who might be affected by this issue in the future) plus I think I've about used up my Suggestion-fu for the month week day. I need to just get my ransomed images fixed already, then maybe...

ETA5, 9-16-17: after taking a break to make tuna pasta salad from scratch, because yum, I decided to roll "don't rename image files" - along with "add a search box" - into an existing Suggestion (my second one, with a request my rewrite be released from queue instead of its predecessor). And I'm not trying to stay up all night (yeah, for once, right) so I'll pick up again on this tomorrow, maybe.

In retrospect, I'm sort of glad I waited this long to look into moving my images, because I either never had the time or else the presence of mind before to dive this deep into why DW's image hosting is or isn't workable for moving images from another host. It really isn't, but it seems most of its issues could easily be remedied...problem is, there are so many ways to fix various issues or shortcomings in the service I really had a hard time choosing which to give preference to, so I just submitted all of them. :/

Interesting Links for 14-09-2017

Thursday, September 14th, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker

The Ottoman Slap

Thursday, September 14th, 2017 12:01 am
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
[personal profile] fayanora
This is fucking weird and cool: Apparently the Ottoman Turkish soldiers back in the day had a fighting technique they could use if they lost their weapons, called the Ottoman Slap. These guys could slap hard enough to knock out a horse or kill a human being. And they did it because in their culture, punching people was what women did, and slapping was the manly thing to do.

Link: http://www.sickchirpse.com/ottoman-slap/

Interesting Links for 13-09-2017

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017 12:00 pm